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Publications

Welcome  to  the  Publications  page, this  page  has  two  purposes. Firstly   it  provides  a  list  of  the  scientific  papers, articles and books  which  members  of  the  team  have  published, thereby  providing  NCF  members with  readily accessible sources of information. Secondly  if  members  feel  they  have  written or published  articles  which  are relevant  to  the  NCF  then  such  articles, if  approved  by  the  Team, can  also  be  referenced  on  this  page. You may submit  articles  as email attachments  via  the Contact  Us page.

 

 

 

Articles

Nature’s Code A New Emerging Theory Developed By Dr Vanessa Hill and Dr Peter Rowlands. A précis by Dr Vanessa Hill (2007).view

Labour can only contemplate hanivg a role anywhere, let alone at European level, when it gets its own policies right. But this is, in my opinion, not far off. New Labour in government did many things very well including many big things, but got a few things wrong – problem is they were both biggies, i.e. Iraq/Bush and tax/wealth inequality. Both the latter can be put right and noises from the leadership campaign so far are encouraging, though it is early days yet.There are two real lessons since 1997, so much more obvious since 2008. First, this is the end of Anglo-Saxon capitalism. It has failed. It did produce some growth, but only because politicians (including Labour unfortunately) connived in the creation of bubbles – indebtedness masquerading as wealth. Second, it’s a red herring to talk about the role of government being “big” or “small”, as the Tories like to. What’s important is that government plays the right role. And we know clearly that this role must include strong but open and fair regulation, as well as significant intervention where the market simply does not work, especially large scale investment in public services and infrastructure. Government needs to re-assert itself and push out the market where the market has no place. The market is about pecuniary relationships, and that is fine as far as it goes and is the best way we know to create wealth. But government is, or should be, about human relationships, how to use and distribute that wealth. When government forgets this and tries to act like any other market player that’s when the problems start.The European Left should unite around this, and on the whole I think it is doing so. The current move to the right in Europe is temporary, part of the inevitable cycle, not the end of everything. I can already see the tide turning. If there was an election in Denmark tomorrow, the left would win hands down. Similar signs in France and Germany as well.The European project has been successful in so many areas already, and will continue to succeed, if only because there is too much political capital invested in it. It’s also like democracy – a terrible system, but the problem is all the others are much worse. Yes, there is poverty in Europe, but how much worse would that be without the EU, which, although clumsy and slow (democracy is clumsy and slow!) is a better regulatory regime than we’ve ever had internationally. The world, whether we like it or not is moving towards more and more cooperation and interdependence (economic, social, political). Can you really imagine a single member state leaving the EU and trying to stand alone? (Perhaps Germany which might be able to stand alone for a bit, plus Tory nutters in the UK?). Iceland, Croatia, and still Turkey are trying to get in.We need to go back to managed capitalism, what we use to call a mixed economy – we know this works full employment policies, strong trade unions,, capital controls, but also strong support for entrepreneurship and economic efficiency. Of course, this now needs also to be green, In all these areas, we should not be ideological, dogmatic or tribal, but must focus on what works. I am Labour because history and common sense (not ideology) show me that Labour has the best values and policies to ensure government has the role that makes things work ordinary people in the long term. The only thing I like about the Con-Dem coalition is that they are working together – trouble is on the wrong policies, but that will soon become apparent.Labour cannot send in a task force to tell sister parties elsewhere in Europe what to do – that is the opposite of democracy. But is can listen, tell, support and learn, including through formalised relationships when these are freely agreed. Yes, with benchmarks if all agree. An Estonian told me just the other day that the main problem with the Left in Eastern Europe is that it remains tribal (just like the old communist parties), with party loyalty rather than experience dictating what policies get rolled out, and too closed to any notion of openness and transparency. This is the real cause of corruption. Blair, bless his cotton socks, was right about the big tent and that we need new bold thinking. As long as our values are firm we should embrace that.Jeremy Millard (Denmark)I3yObV tmfaoppdhfhsI think “crisis” is a bit dramatic for what we’re describing here and I can’t help but wonder if it’s a way to make expected insecurity sound more important or significant, as though it’s a valid reason to complain that much more. But, then, maybe the same thing happened for mid-life crisis. I’ve heard a theory that life takes a turn around the age of 27: people get married/have kids, finish grad school, move, change jobs, whatever. So maybe it’s a confluence of any number of those factors that contributes to this phenomenon. I think what you’ve hit on, Zandria, in your last paragraph, is a nice description of contentment. I feel like it’s not dependent on external circumstances, but an overall settled, accepting state of mind, rather than always looking around for the next best thing.

 

Books

 

 

References

Nature’s Code

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Fundamental structures applied to physics and biology, in K. Bowden (ed.), Conceptions (Proceedings of XXVII ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2005), 324-60, 2006. view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Nature’s code (I), in K. Bowden (ed.), Foundations (Proceedings of XXVIII ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2006), 282-300, 2007. view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, chapter 19, pp. 502-55, in P. Rowlands, Zero to Infinity, World Scientific, Singapore, Hackensack, NJ, and London, October, 2007. view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Nature’s code II, in K. Bowden and A. D. Ford (ed.), Exactness (Proceedings of XXIX ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2007), 160-177, 2008. view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Nature’s code, AIP Conference Proceedings, 1051, 117-26, 2008. (Won best paper award at CASYS07) award picture).view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Nature’s code III, to be published in Proceedings of XXX ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2008 (2009).view

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, Nature’s Fundamental Symmetry-Breaking, to be published in International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 2010

V. J. Hill and P. Rowlands, The Numbers of Nature’s Code, to be published in International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 2010

 

Universal rewrite system and related topics

P. Rowlands and B. Diaz, A universal alphabet and rewrite system.view  

P. Marcer.  Anticipation and Meaning   AIP, American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings 573 (selected papers). COMPUTING ANTICIPATORY SYSTEMS, edt. by Daniel Dubois.  CASYS 2000- Fourth International Conference, Liege, Belgium, August 7-12, 2000.  Pub. by AIP, 706p., 2001. ISSN 0094-243. ISBN 0-7354-0012-1 view

P. Marcer, E. Mitchell, P. Rowlands and W. Schempp, Zenergy: The ‘phaseonium’ of dark energy that fuels the natural structures of the Universe, International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 16, 189-202, 2005. view

P. Marcer, P. Rowlands and B. Diaz, Nilpotence: the key to a theory of everything, ANPA, in K. Bowden (ed.), Against Bull, 2005 (Proceedings of XXVI ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2004), 231-46. view

B. Diaz and P. Rowlands, A computational path to the nilpotent Dirac equation, International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 16, 203-18, 2005. view

B. Diaz and P. Rowlands, The infinite square roots of –1, International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 19, 229-235, 2006. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, A remarkable quantum mechanical discovery, International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 19, 261-278, 2006. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, The Evolutionary ‘Anthropic’ Semantic Principle, in K. Bowden (ed.), Conceptions (Proceedings of XXVII ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2005), 361-70, 2006. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, The Evolutionary ‘Anthropic’ Semantic Principle II, in K. Bowden (ed.), Foundations (Proceedings of XXVIII ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2006), 327-34, 2007. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, How intelligence evolved?, in Quantum Interaction, Papers from the AAAI Spring Symposium, Technical Report SS-07-08. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, Artificial intelligence and Nature’s fundamental process, published by AAAI, March 2008. view

B. Diaz, P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, Riemann Hypothesis, International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems. view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, How general is nilpotency?, to be published in Proceedings of XXX ANPA Conference, Cambridge, August 2008 (2009). view

P. Marcer and P. Rowlands, The Grammatical Universe and the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement, to be published in AIP Conference Proceedings, 2010

P. Rowlands, Mathematics and Physics as Emergent Aspects of a Universal Rewrite System, to be published in International Journal of Computing Anticipatory Systems, 2010